Figuring out whether you should drop a class may be one of the most difficult decisions you have to make at college. You need to be sure you won’t regret your decision, especially if you drop the class too late to receive your money back. Having said that, there are certain indications that dropping a class is the best course of action.

1. Other People Recommend It

The most important person to talk to before you drop a class is your student advisor or registrar. It’s critical that you’re clear about the process and know what the consequences of dropping the class will be. In addition, though, you should talk to students who have already taken the class, your professor, and the department head. They can tell you if the class will become even more difficult and if you’re likely to continue struggling.

2. It Will Lower Your GPA

The last thing you want is to allow a single class to bring down your GPA. If the class is a requirement for your major, it could be better to take it at a later date — when you’re more prepared or you have more room in your schedule. If the class is an elective that you thought you were going to enjoy, learn from the experience. There may still be time to switch to something completely different.

3. You’ll Definitely Fail

There’s no point continuing with the class if you’re sure you’ll fail. For some classes, the final exam counts for your entire grade, in which case you may be able to work to improve your understanding of the material. However, if the class uses a continuous assessment model and something happened early that ruined your chances of passing — such as you missed the due date for a crucial assignment, you submitted the wrong work, or you forgot to set your alarm and overslept on the day of the test — the only solution may be to drop the class.

4. You Received Incorrect Information

Perhaps you thought the class was required for your major or maybe you missed the section in the course outline that specified a prerequisite that you don’t have. The class could even have changed from previous semesters and you read old information. In any case, it may be better to take the class later or drop it entirely.

5. Your Attendance Is Almost Nonexistent

You may skip a class because you dislike it or because you struggle to fit it into your schedule. In the latter scenario, you may have two classes back to back located on different parts of campus, or the class may clash with the schedule for your part-time job or another commitment. It’s best to come to the conclusion early that you can’t possibly attend the class, so it would be best to drp it.

6. The Class Is Simply a Nightmare

There may be a chance that you’d pass the class (perhaps even with a decent grade) if you stuck with it, but it’s ruining your life at the moment. It doesn’t matter if this is due to the materials, the professor, your workload, or something else: if a class is negatively affecting your mental health, it’s not worth continuing.

There’s also a possibility that the class is not the problem: it’s your study space. This is likely the case if you feel that several of your classes are unmanageable or that you’re falling behind in general. Instead of dropping classes, find a better place to study than your dorm room. A great solution is to move into Durham College off-campus housing. At Foundry Simcoe, you can have your own room in a five-bedroom townhouse or in a three-bedroom suite. Apply now before all the units are sold out.

rachel_grier@outlook.com

Author rachel_grier@outlook.com

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